commentary: Conspiracy Theory (Part Fifteen)


John W. Ritenbaugh
Given 28-Mar-15; Sermon #1259c; 12 minutes

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John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that philosophy claims to focus on reality and existence, allegedly allowing only that which can be verified by the five senses, suggests that educators steeped in worldly philosophy relegate the existence of God and moral principles to the realm of opinion rather than fact. Consequently, our culture, protectively 'insulated' from any reference to God or sustainable ethical values, has become fractious, divided, angry, and confused. Virtually all claims to value or ethical standards have been relegated to the realm of opinion. Elementary students have been brainwashed into accepting the moral relativity—'there are no absolutes'—mantra, while evolution is taught as fact (though the proof for this theory is even less sustainable than a creationist hypothesis). Young people entering the universities and colleges have already been conditioned to accept the colossal lie of the existence of a creation without a creator. Schools of philosophy, emanating from ancient Greek luminaries such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, have permeated the psyches of university students, eager to glom onto the rudiments of the world, conditioning them to follow charismatic leaders, tuned into the spirit of the cosmos, surcharged with the mind and spirit of the current ruler of this world, Satan the Devil. Satan has been feverishly attempting to gain control of the educational system of the world, recognizing that the educator (secular and religious) can do more lasting damage than any other member of society.

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Aristotle Colossians 2:8 Ephesians 1:1-2 Evolution Existence of God unsupported by 'facts' Facts and opinions Is Common Core Really Teaching Children to Be Moral . John 10:2-5 Justin P. McBrayer Moral claims as opinions Philosophy No moral absolutes Plato 'Rational' thinking Reliance on rational proof Rudiments of the world Satan' spirit pervading the cosmos Sheep instinct Socrates Traditions of men














 


 
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